What Is Science?

Last Word Let’s talk about this word “science”. Richard Hill Words are curious things. They are a symbolic artefact that we use to send a representation of what is in our thinking across the “social synapse” to another person or people who, in the miracle of “communication”, are able to share thoughts and ideas. That is amazing! But one of … Read More

The COVID-19 pandemic is a paradoxical challenge to our nervous system: a polyvagal perspective. By Stephen W. Porges

Abstract The spread of the sarsCov2 virus presents an unprecedented event that rapidly introduced widespread life threat, economic de-stabilization, and social isolation. The human nervous system is tuned to detect safety and danger, integrating body and brain responses via the autonomic nervous system. Polyvagal Theory provides a perspective to understand the impact of the pandemic on mental and physical health. … Read More

The Integrative Leader: IPNB and Leadership Practice

by Lynn Redenbach IPNB’s relevance to leadership has been proposed and written about by scholars and practitioners. However, up to now there has been no empirical research to help illuminate what they are doing, and how leaders and leadership consultants, are approaching their work from this perspective. In addition, there has not been a clear understanding about the implications IPNB … Read More

“This is the greatest discovery of the scientific enterprise: You take hydrogen gas, and you leave it alone, and it turns into rosebushes, giraffes, and humans.” by Bonnie Badenoch, PhD, LMFT

“This is the greatest discovery of the scientific enterprise: You take hydrogen gas, and you leave it alone, and it turns into rosebushes, giraffes, and humans.” Brian Swimme, evolutionary cosmologist Professor at California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco, California These words from Brian Swimme may help us find a place to stand as we contemplate ways we can lean … Read More

Raising Awareness of Our Internalized Woundedness, by Rhonda V. Magee

Excerpted from THE INNER WORK OF RACIAL JUSTICE, by Rhonda V. Magee, published by TarcherPerigee, an imprint of Penguin Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Random House, LLC. Copyright © 2021 by Rhonda V. Magee. Raising Awareness of Our Internalized Woundedness When I talk about race with other people of color, we usually focus on the ways in which we … Read More

Using DMM attachment theory to help clients and parents

CSI Conflict Model Circumplex

By Mark Baumann, 2021 The attachment system is a survival system. It’s one of our many survival systems, similar to the fight-flight-freeze and larger polyvagal system. Perhaps one way those two systems differ is that attachment experiences have been found to have life span impact on patterns of human communication and information processing. One of attachment’s unique benefits is that … Read More

Resilience: 6 Steps to BOUNCE Back, by Mary Meador, MD

What is resilience? It is the sometimes elusive quality that allows some people to be knocked down by life and come back stronger than ever. Rather than letting failure, trauma or misfortune overcome them and drain their resolve, they find a way to bounce back. Resilience, it turns out, is reflected in our body’s ability to adapt under stress. We … Read More

Nervous Systems in an Anxious Time: The Neurobiology of Crisis, Trauma, and Resilience.

The following is excerpted from the presentation, “Nervous Systems in an Anxious Time: The Neurobiology of Crisis, Trauma, and Resilience,” by Gregory Czyszczon, Ph.D., LPC, offered as part of Eastern Mennonite University’s Trauma and Resilience in Healthcare Settings certificate program. To counter such a possibility, the human nervous system/embodied brain has evolved to ensure our survival. Not only that, it … Read More

The Importance of Evolved Nest

By Darcia Narvaez, EvolvedNest.org It is becoming increasingly clear that the developmental system our species evolved is critical for fostering our fullest capacities. I call this the evolved nest, for short. We’ve been gathering data and compiling research on the components for over ten years (see here). When we observe the people in societies who provide the evolved nest, we … Read More

Feelings Gone Awry: Emotion as Progenitor of the Anomalous

By Michael Jawer  Twenty-plus years ago I went on my first – and, so far, only – poltergeist investigation.  It was at the invitation of the late William Roll, PhD, a renowned parapsychologist in that small field.  I drove to a central Pennsylvania town, where I met a middle-aged couple who’d asked Roll for his help given a purported string … Read More